Unnamed Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ

Unnamed Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ

No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Exterior Photography, WindowsNo Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Exterior photography, windows, facade, urban landscapeNo Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Exterior Photography, Windows, FacadeNo Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Interior Photography, Concrete, Windows, Beam+ 86


  • Area Area of ​​this architecture project Area :
    6060 m²

  • Year Year of realization of this architectural project

    Year:


    2021


  • Photographs
No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Exterior Photography, Windows
Bird’s eye view of the No Name Art Museum and surrounding area. Photo © Fangfang Tian

Text description provided by the architects. Since a collection of works by Wu Dayu might not be exhibited in this museum, the name Wu Dayu Art Museum was dropped. We use the No Name Art Museum only on a temporary basis. However, the design of this piece of architecture took a lot of inspiration from him.

No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Image 58 of 86
Sketch of the spatial function. Image courtesy of Yonghe Zhang
No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Exterior Photography, Windows, Cityscape, Facade
No Name Art Museum is in harmony with the white walls and gray tiles of the buildings in Wuzhen. Photo © Fangfang Tian
No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Outdoor photography, urban landscape
Bird’s eye view of the artist’s residence and the multipurpose room. Photo © Fangfang Tian

Wu Dayu. Wu Dayu (1903-1988) was a painter, educator and poet and considered the founding father of Chinese abstract painting. He was born in Yixing, Jiangsu, and went to France in 1922 to study oil painting and sculpture. After returning to China, he established the National Academy of Arts (now the China Academy of Arts) in Hangzhou with Lin Fengmian and others and headed its department of Western paintings. Wu lost his teaching job in the 1950s and painted in his home in a ten square meter attic until his death.

Our architectural design was influenced by the art of Wu Dayu. His quests for ‘Li’ (strength) and ‘Ning’ (serenity) in his small, postcard-sized paintings prompted us to gaze intently at the scale of architectural space. Wu’s poem, King Kongfurther vividly describes the dynamics and volatility of the architectural experience:
Shadow cheats on the figure
Time mocks space
Without sound and without trace
I go in and out of the darkness of time

No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Image 59 of 86
Spatial tension contrast. Image courtesy of Yonghe Zhang
No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Outdoor Photography
View of the stepped buildings across the river. Photo © Fangfang Tian
No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Interior Photography
Interior space of the main entrance. Photo © Fangfang Tian

Time. Wu’s poem inspired us to explore the time dimension of architecture. Can time be designed? Borrow the book of the French philosopher Francios Jullien On time for a theoretical orientation, we compared the time of China and Europe. Classic Western time: The observer is timeless; time and space are separated; time is rhythmic, divisible, unidirectional, with beginning and end. Past and future are clearly defined but not present. This is the objective time. Traditional Chinese time: The observer is in time; time and space cannot be separated; time varies, is continuous and oncoming, without beginning or end. This time is always present and can be called subject time. The elasticity of Chinese time provides design possibilities.

No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Image 61 of 86
Main entrance and reception hall. Image courtesy of FCJZ
No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Exterior Photography, Windows
Bird’s eye view of the main entrance and reception. Photo © Fangfang Tian
No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Outdoor Photography
Different materials form a variety of texture. Photo © Fangfang Tian

The case of the nine-bend bridge: if a body of water can be crossed with 3 steps, with a nine-bend bridge it can take 27 steps, which means that the time is 9 times longer, therefore the space seems much bigger. We combined Chinese time and Western perspective and designed wedge-shaped spaces that are both programmed and pure: these spaces are stretched by perspective in one direction and compressed in the other; thus, the spatio-temporal perception changes with each movement of the visitor. It demonstrates the incommensurability of time and space and enriches the experience to the point where one can get lost and embark on a journey of discovery. The Wu Dayu Art Museum is a playground of space and time.

No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Image 62 of 86
Water triangle. Image courtesy of FCJZ
No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Outdoor Photography
Overlooking the wedge-shaped courtyard (on the right) and the water court (on the left). Photo © Fangfang Tian
No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Interior Photography
Through the wedge-shaped courtyard door, looking out at the continuous overhang of the tea room. Photo © Fangfang Tian

Space. The essence of an art museum is to provide a You or wandering experience. The spatial relationship naturally becomes the main focus of the design. Thus, in addition to the manipulation of perspectives, we introduced the concept of “pure architectural space”: a series of exterior or semi-exterior spaces serving as transitions between programs. They are configured to possess dramatic tensions, intensifying temporal and spatial dynamics in the process of a journey through architecture. The overall spatial structure of this building complex is arranged in Yuan (yards) and Jin (layers), generating a dialogue with Chinese architectural traditions and superimposing another layer of experience on the play of perspective.

No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Windows, Facade
Exhibition area. Image courtesy of FCJZ
No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Interior Photography, Facade
Multifunctional entrance hall. Photo © Fangfang Tian
No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Interior Photography, Concrete, Windows, Beam
Interior space of the multifunctional room. Photo © Fangfang Tian

Form. Paying attention to spatio-temporal experiences allows us to break away from static compositions, which means that the formal relationship between stereoscopic volumes and flat elevations is dissolved. In this regard, the work of a Swedish architect, Sigurd Lewerentz, provided us with great inspiration.

No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Image 64 of 86
Workshop space. Image courtesy of FCJZ
No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Exterior Photography, Windows, Facade
Overlooking the water court. Photo © Fangfang Tian
No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Exterior Photography, Facade
View of the riverside end of the Water-court. Photo © Fangfang Tian

Structure. The structural system of this project is partly made of concrete slabs without beams with irregularly shaped columns without beams or columns, and partly of steel frames.

No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Outdoor Photography
tile wall covering. Photo © Fangfang Tian
No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Interior Photography, Steel
Tile-louvered wall. Photo © Fangfang Tian

Regional culture + Material. Besides space, we also pay homage in our design to the vernacular houses of Wuzhen, which is part of Jiangnan (south of the Yangtze River), in terms of materials and colors. Thus, the use of terracotta tiles on the roofs and concrete tiles on the walls as well as the exposure of concrete walls constitute a rich and subtle color palette of black-white-grey. At this stage, the construction of the landscape and the interior of this building remains incomplete.

No Name Art Museum / Atelier FCJZ - Outdoor Photography, Windows, Garden
Overlooking the exhibition area. Photo © Fangfang Tian

Mildred D. Field